Q

Anonymous asked:

love your tumblr pal

A

Thank you :D

sticker-porn:

#?street #bethnalgreen #streetart #? #london by karlie.peipman http://ift.tt/Xgyl0v

pixodesign:

Brick lane #graffiti #art photo by _jaketucker - Transforme seu Tumblr em uma loja online, saiba como em ShopMyTumblr

pixodesign:

Graffiti tour
#vibes #newhorizons #ntrprnrs #graffiti #stoke photo by dlysrsuk - Transforme seu Tumblr em uma loja online, saiba como em ShopMyTumblr

pixodesign:

#quotes #creative #love #imagination #art #graffiti photo by angelswriteaboutyoursoul - Transforme seu Tumblr em uma loja online, saiba como em ShopMyTumblr

cross-connect:

Shinichi Maruyama 

 Born in Nagano, Japan in 1968, Shinichi Maruyama hurls black India ink into water and photographs the millisecond that these two liquids collide. Capable of capturing this phenomenon at a 7,500th of a second, Maruyama takes full advantage of a recent advancement in strobe light technology which can record physical events faster than the naked eye can perceive them. In the series Kusho, which means “writing in the sky,” Maruyama’s goal is to arrest in space and time the sublime intersection of two different media before they merge into one. In some respects, the project resembles a scientific experiment, but in Maruyama’s artistic hands, the total action becomes a form of Shodo (Japanese calligraphy) performance—with the gesture executed in the air rather than on the flat surface of the paper. “Once your brush touches paper, you must finish the character, you have one chance. It can never be repeated or duplicated. You must commit your full attention and being to each stroke. Liquids, like ink, are elusive by nature. As sumi ink finds its own path through the paper grain, liquid finds its unique path as it moves through air.” -Shinichi Maruyama Txt Via MyModernMet

                                                     && cross-connect:

Shinichi Maruyama 

 Born in Nagano, Japan in 1968, Shinichi Maruyama hurls black India ink into water and photographs the millisecond that these two liquids collide. Capable of capturing this phenomenon at a 7,500th of a second, Maruyama takes full advantage of a recent advancement in strobe light technology which can record physical events faster than the naked eye can perceive them. In the series Kusho, which means “writing in the sky,” Maruyama’s goal is to arrest in space and time the sublime intersection of two different media before they merge into one. In some respects, the project resembles a scientific experiment, but in Maruyama’s artistic hands, the total action becomes a form of Shodo (Japanese calligraphy) performance—with the gesture executed in the air rather than on the flat surface of the paper. “Once your brush touches paper, you must finish the character, you have one chance. It can never be repeated or duplicated. You must commit your full attention and being to each stroke. Liquids, like ink, are elusive by nature. As sumi ink finds its own path through the paper grain, liquid finds its unique path as it moves through air.” -Shinichi Maruyama Txt Via MyModernMet

                                                     && cross-connect:

Shinichi Maruyama 

 Born in Nagano, Japan in 1968, Shinichi Maruyama hurls black India ink into water and photographs the millisecond that these two liquids collide. Capable of capturing this phenomenon at a 7,500th of a second, Maruyama takes full advantage of a recent advancement in strobe light technology which can record physical events faster than the naked eye can perceive them. In the series Kusho, which means “writing in the sky,” Maruyama’s goal is to arrest in space and time the sublime intersection of two different media before they merge into one. In some respects, the project resembles a scientific experiment, but in Maruyama’s artistic hands, the total action becomes a form of Shodo (Japanese calligraphy) performance—with the gesture executed in the air rather than on the flat surface of the paper. “Once your brush touches paper, you must finish the character, you have one chance. It can never be repeated or duplicated. You must commit your full attention and being to each stroke. Liquids, like ink, are elusive by nature. As sumi ink finds its own path through the paper grain, liquid finds its unique path as it moves through air.” -Shinichi Maruyama Txt Via MyModernMet

                                                     && cross-connect:

Shinichi Maruyama 

 Born in Nagano, Japan in 1968, Shinichi Maruyama hurls black India ink into water and photographs the millisecond that these two liquids collide. Capable of capturing this phenomenon at a 7,500th of a second, Maruyama takes full advantage of a recent advancement in strobe light technology which can record physical events faster than the naked eye can perceive them. In the series Kusho, which means “writing in the sky,” Maruyama’s goal is to arrest in space and time the sublime intersection of two different media before they merge into one. In some respects, the project resembles a scientific experiment, but in Maruyama’s artistic hands, the total action becomes a form of Shodo (Japanese calligraphy) performance—with the gesture executed in the air rather than on the flat surface of the paper. “Once your brush touches paper, you must finish the character, you have one chance. It can never be repeated or duplicated. You must commit your full attention and being to each stroke. Liquids, like ink, are elusive by nature. As sumi ink finds its own path through the paper grain, liquid finds its unique path as it moves through air.” -Shinichi Maruyama Txt Via MyModernMet

                                                     && cross-connect:

Shinichi Maruyama 

 Born in Nagano, Japan in 1968, Shinichi Maruyama hurls black India ink into water and photographs the millisecond that these two liquids collide. Capable of capturing this phenomenon at a 7,500th of a second, Maruyama takes full advantage of a recent advancement in strobe light technology which can record physical events faster than the naked eye can perceive them. In the series Kusho, which means “writing in the sky,” Maruyama’s goal is to arrest in space and time the sublime intersection of two different media before they merge into one. In some respects, the project resembles a scientific experiment, but in Maruyama’s artistic hands, the total action becomes a form of Shodo (Japanese calligraphy) performance—with the gesture executed in the air rather than on the flat surface of the paper. “Once your brush touches paper, you must finish the character, you have one chance. It can never be repeated or duplicated. You must commit your full attention and being to each stroke. Liquids, like ink, are elusive by nature. As sumi ink finds its own path through the paper grain, liquid finds its unique path as it moves through air.” -Shinichi Maruyama Txt Via MyModernMet

                                                     && cross-connect:

Shinichi Maruyama 

 Born in Nagano, Japan in 1968, Shinichi Maruyama hurls black India ink into water and photographs the millisecond that these two liquids collide. Capable of capturing this phenomenon at a 7,500th of a second, Maruyama takes full advantage of a recent advancement in strobe light technology which can record physical events faster than the naked eye can perceive them. In the series Kusho, which means “writing in the sky,” Maruyama’s goal is to arrest in space and time the sublime intersection of two different media before they merge into one. In some respects, the project resembles a scientific experiment, but in Maruyama’s artistic hands, the total action becomes a form of Shodo (Japanese calligraphy) performance—with the gesture executed in the air rather than on the flat surface of the paper. “Once your brush touches paper, you must finish the character, you have one chance. It can never be repeated or duplicated. You must commit your full attention and being to each stroke. Liquids, like ink, are elusive by nature. As sumi ink finds its own path through the paper grain, liquid finds its unique path as it moves through air.” -Shinichi Maruyama Txt Via MyModernMet

                                                     && cross-connect:

Shinichi Maruyama 

 Born in Nagano, Japan in 1968, Shinichi Maruyama hurls black India ink into water and photographs the millisecond that these two liquids collide. Capable of capturing this phenomenon at a 7,500th of a second, Maruyama takes full advantage of a recent advancement in strobe light technology which can record physical events faster than the naked eye can perceive them. In the series Kusho, which means “writing in the sky,” Maruyama’s goal is to arrest in space and time the sublime intersection of two different media before they merge into one. In some respects, the project resembles a scientific experiment, but in Maruyama’s artistic hands, the total action becomes a form of Shodo (Japanese calligraphy) performance—with the gesture executed in the air rather than on the flat surface of the paper. “Once your brush touches paper, you must finish the character, you have one chance. It can never be repeated or duplicated. You must commit your full attention and being to each stroke. Liquids, like ink, are elusive by nature. As sumi ink finds its own path through the paper grain, liquid finds its unique path as it moves through air.” -Shinichi Maruyama Txt Via MyModernMet

                                                     && cross-connect:

Shinichi Maruyama 

 Born in Nagano, Japan in 1968, Shinichi Maruyama hurls black India ink into water and photographs the millisecond that these two liquids collide. Capable of capturing this phenomenon at a 7,500th of a second, Maruyama takes full advantage of a recent advancement in strobe light technology which can record physical events faster than the naked eye can perceive them. In the series Kusho, which means “writing in the sky,” Maruyama’s goal is to arrest in space and time the sublime intersection of two different media before they merge into one. In some respects, the project resembles a scientific experiment, but in Maruyama’s artistic hands, the total action becomes a form of Shodo (Japanese calligraphy) performance—with the gesture executed in the air rather than on the flat surface of the paper. “Once your brush touches paper, you must finish the character, you have one chance. It can never be repeated or duplicated. You must commit your full attention and being to each stroke. Liquids, like ink, are elusive by nature. As sumi ink finds its own path through the paper grain, liquid finds its unique path as it moves through air.” -Shinichi Maruyama Txt Via MyModernMet

                                                     && cross-connect:

Shinichi Maruyama 

 Born in Nagano, Japan in 1968, Shinichi Maruyama hurls black India ink into water and photographs the millisecond that these two liquids collide. Capable of capturing this phenomenon at a 7,500th of a second, Maruyama takes full advantage of a recent advancement in strobe light technology which can record physical events faster than the naked eye can perceive them. In the series Kusho, which means “writing in the sky,” Maruyama’s goal is to arrest in space and time the sublime intersection of two different media before they merge into one. In some respects, the project resembles a scientific experiment, but in Maruyama’s artistic hands, the total action becomes a form of Shodo (Japanese calligraphy) performance—with the gesture executed in the air rather than on the flat surface of the paper. “Once your brush touches paper, you must finish the character, you have one chance. It can never be repeated or duplicated. You must commit your full attention and being to each stroke. Liquids, like ink, are elusive by nature. As sumi ink finds its own path through the paper grain, liquid finds its unique path as it moves through air.” -Shinichi Maruyama Txt Via MyModernMet

                                                     && cross-connect:

Shinichi Maruyama 

 Born in Nagano, Japan in 1968, Shinichi Maruyama hurls black India ink into water and photographs the millisecond that these two liquids collide. Capable of capturing this phenomenon at a 7,500th of a second, Maruyama takes full advantage of a recent advancement in strobe light technology which can record physical events faster than the naked eye can perceive them. In the series Kusho, which means “writing in the sky,” Maruyama’s goal is to arrest in space and time the sublime intersection of two different media before they merge into one. In some respects, the project resembles a scientific experiment, but in Maruyama’s artistic hands, the total action becomes a form of Shodo (Japanese calligraphy) performance—with the gesture executed in the air rather than on the flat surface of the paper. “Once your brush touches paper, you must finish the character, you have one chance. It can never be repeated or duplicated. You must commit your full attention and being to each stroke. Liquids, like ink, are elusive by nature. As sumi ink finds its own path through the paper grain, liquid finds its unique path as it moves through air.” -Shinichi Maruyama Txt Via MyModernMet

                                                     &&

cross-connect:

Shinichi Maruyama

 Born in Nagano, Japan in 1968, Shinichi Maruyama hurls black India ink into water and photographs the millisecond that these two liquids collide. Capable of capturing this phenomenon at a 7,500th of a second, Maruyama takes full advantage of a recent advancement in strobe light technology which can record physical events faster than the naked eye can perceive them. In the series Kusho, which means “writing in the sky,” Maruyama’s goal is to arrest in space and time the sublime intersection of two different media before they merge into one. In some respects, the project resembles a scientific experiment, but in Maruyama’s artistic hands, the total action becomes a form of Shodo (Japanese calligraphy) performance—with the gesture executed in the air rather than on the flat surface of the paper. “Once your brush touches paper, you must finish the character, you have one chance. It can never be repeated or duplicated. You must commit your full attention and being to each stroke. Liquids, like ink, are elusive by nature. As sumi ink finds its own path through the paper grain, liquid finds its unique path as it moves through air.” -Shinichi Maruyama Txt Via MyModernMet

                                                     &&

instagram:

Chasing Pop Visions and Cartoon Dreams with @alia_pop

For more whimsical portraits and fantasy stylings, follow @alia_pop on Instagram.

“I want to create a fantastic world of hypnotic color and classic dreaminess,” says LA-based artist, Alia Penner (@alia_pop). “I have painted on people, horses, bouncy castles and even a school bus.”

Bold patterns and colors are everywhere in Alia’s work, which ranges from high-profile fashion shoots to giant, painted Starbucks cups in Hollywood. But her Instagram account feels more like a special curation of the art she makes at home—a bright mishmash of celebrity face collages and quirky magazine cutouts.

“Just for fun, I started coloring in the New York Times every Sunday, using it sort of like a sketchbook. I added color to the iconic black and white images of starlets, then put them on Instagram,” she says. “They really popped.”

Perhaps unsurprisingly, Alia’s daily sources of inspiration are just as eclectic as her art: she lists balloons, polish movie posters, hand-tinted films and unopened paint cans, among others. At the end of the day, though, her job is about having fun.

“My favorite projects are the ones that feel like play from start to finish,” she says. “I’m a child at heart.” instagram:

Chasing Pop Visions and Cartoon Dreams with @alia_pop

For more whimsical portraits and fantasy stylings, follow @alia_pop on Instagram.

“I want to create a fantastic world of hypnotic color and classic dreaminess,” says LA-based artist, Alia Penner (@alia_pop). “I have painted on people, horses, bouncy castles and even a school bus.”

Bold patterns and colors are everywhere in Alia’s work, which ranges from high-profile fashion shoots to giant, painted Starbucks cups in Hollywood. But her Instagram account feels more like a special curation of the art she makes at home—a bright mishmash of celebrity face collages and quirky magazine cutouts.

“Just for fun, I started coloring in the New York Times every Sunday, using it sort of like a sketchbook. I added color to the iconic black and white images of starlets, then put them on Instagram,” she says. “They really popped.”

Perhaps unsurprisingly, Alia’s daily sources of inspiration are just as eclectic as her art: she lists balloons, polish movie posters, hand-tinted films and unopened paint cans, among others. At the end of the day, though, her job is about having fun.

“My favorite projects are the ones that feel like play from start to finish,” she says. “I’m a child at heart.” instagram:

Chasing Pop Visions and Cartoon Dreams with @alia_pop

For more whimsical portraits and fantasy stylings, follow @alia_pop on Instagram.

“I want to create a fantastic world of hypnotic color and classic dreaminess,” says LA-based artist, Alia Penner (@alia_pop). “I have painted on people, horses, bouncy castles and even a school bus.”

Bold patterns and colors are everywhere in Alia’s work, which ranges from high-profile fashion shoots to giant, painted Starbucks cups in Hollywood. But her Instagram account feels more like a special curation of the art she makes at home—a bright mishmash of celebrity face collages and quirky magazine cutouts.

“Just for fun, I started coloring in the New York Times every Sunday, using it sort of like a sketchbook. I added color to the iconic black and white images of starlets, then put them on Instagram,” she says. “They really popped.”

Perhaps unsurprisingly, Alia’s daily sources of inspiration are just as eclectic as her art: she lists balloons, polish movie posters, hand-tinted films and unopened paint cans, among others. At the end of the day, though, her job is about having fun.

“My favorite projects are the ones that feel like play from start to finish,” she says. “I’m a child at heart.” instagram:

Chasing Pop Visions and Cartoon Dreams with @alia_pop

For more whimsical portraits and fantasy stylings, follow @alia_pop on Instagram.

“I want to create a fantastic world of hypnotic color and classic dreaminess,” says LA-based artist, Alia Penner (@alia_pop). “I have painted on people, horses, bouncy castles and even a school bus.”

Bold patterns and colors are everywhere in Alia’s work, which ranges from high-profile fashion shoots to giant, painted Starbucks cups in Hollywood. But her Instagram account feels more like a special curation of the art she makes at home—a bright mishmash of celebrity face collages and quirky magazine cutouts.

“Just for fun, I started coloring in the New York Times every Sunday, using it sort of like a sketchbook. I added color to the iconic black and white images of starlets, then put them on Instagram,” she says. “They really popped.”

Perhaps unsurprisingly, Alia’s daily sources of inspiration are just as eclectic as her art: she lists balloons, polish movie posters, hand-tinted films and unopened paint cans, among others. At the end of the day, though, her job is about having fun.

“My favorite projects are the ones that feel like play from start to finish,” she says. “I’m a child at heart.” instagram:

Chasing Pop Visions and Cartoon Dreams with @alia_pop

For more whimsical portraits and fantasy stylings, follow @alia_pop on Instagram.

“I want to create a fantastic world of hypnotic color and classic dreaminess,” says LA-based artist, Alia Penner (@alia_pop). “I have painted on people, horses, bouncy castles and even a school bus.”

Bold patterns and colors are everywhere in Alia’s work, which ranges from high-profile fashion shoots to giant, painted Starbucks cups in Hollywood. But her Instagram account feels more like a special curation of the art she makes at home—a bright mishmash of celebrity face collages and quirky magazine cutouts.

“Just for fun, I started coloring in the New York Times every Sunday, using it sort of like a sketchbook. I added color to the iconic black and white images of starlets, then put them on Instagram,” she says. “They really popped.”

Perhaps unsurprisingly, Alia’s daily sources of inspiration are just as eclectic as her art: she lists balloons, polish movie posters, hand-tinted films and unopened paint cans, among others. At the end of the day, though, her job is about having fun.

“My favorite projects are the ones that feel like play from start to finish,” she says. “I’m a child at heart.”

instagram:

Chasing Pop Visions and Cartoon Dreams with @alia_pop

For more whimsical portraits and fantasy stylings, follow @alia_pop on Instagram.

“I want to create a fantastic world of hypnotic color and classic dreaminess,” says LA-based artist, Alia Penner (@alia_pop). “I have painted on people, horses, bouncy castles and even a school bus.”

Bold patterns and colors are everywhere in Alia’s work, which ranges from high-profile fashion shoots to giant, painted Starbucks cups in Hollywood. But her Instagram account feels more like a special curation of the art she makes at home—a bright mishmash of celebrity face collages and quirky magazine cutouts.

“Just for fun, I started coloring in the New York Times every Sunday, using it sort of like a sketchbook. I added color to the iconic black and white images of starlets, then put them on Instagram,” she says. “They really popped.”

Perhaps unsurprisingly, Alia’s daily sources of inspiration are just as eclectic as her art: she lists balloons, polish movie posters, hand-tinted films and unopened paint cans, among others. At the end of the day, though, her job is about having fun.

“My favorite projects are the ones that feel like play from start to finish,” she says. “I’m a child at heart.”

sticker-porn:

OnOffOdv!!!
Yo @rev_odv Olson & Berns!!!
www.ikanografik.com

#artwork #art #france #graffiti #graff #street #streetart #draw #odvcrew #cbscrew #onoffcrew #kano #kanos #ikano #cellograff #cantbestopped #paris #bercy #fatcap #colors #olson #berns #rever by ikanografik http://ift.tt/1pZgVwD


Paradise Lost, Ed Freeman

Paradise Lost, Ed Freeman

Paradise Lost, Ed Freeman

Paradise Lost, Ed Freeman

Paradise Lost, Ed Freeman

Ashish spring 2012 rtw details

Ashish spring 2012 rtw details

Ashish spring 2012 rtw details

Ashish spring 2012 rtw details

Ashish spring 2012 rtw details

Ashish spring 2012 rtw details

Ashish spring 2012 rtw details

(via kissing-monsters)

ineedaguide:

murals by anders gjennestad aka strøk

(via this isn’t happiness) ineedaguide:

murals by anders gjennestad aka strøk

(via this isn’t happiness) ineedaguide:

murals by anders gjennestad aka strøk

(via this isn’t happiness) ineedaguide:

murals by anders gjennestad aka strøk

(via this isn’t happiness) ineedaguide:

murals by anders gjennestad aka strøk

(via this isn’t happiness)
supersonicart:


Chiara Bautista.
Illustrations and paintings by Chiara Bautista (Previously on Supersonic) who is from Tucson, Arizona:
Read More supersonicart:


Chiara Bautista.
Illustrations and paintings by Chiara Bautista (Previously on Supersonic) who is from Tucson, Arizona:
Read More supersonicart:


Chiara Bautista.
Illustrations and paintings by Chiara Bautista (Previously on Supersonic) who is from Tucson, Arizona:
Read More

supersonicart:

Chiara Bautista.

Illustrations and paintings by Chiara Bautista (Previously on Supersonic) who is from Tucson, Arizona:

Read More

supersonicart:


Anthony Lister, “Power Tripping.”
For his new show “Power Tripping" opening tonight - June 26th, 2014 - at Jonathan LeVine Gallery in New York City, New York Anthony Lister has produced a body of paintings that, through rough strokes and bold colors, begin to resemble heroic beings.  Lister calls his style “Adventure Painting” which embraces mistakes and chance.  The method seems to be a successful one as the works are certainly an adventure for the eyes.  See more below:
Read More supersonicart:


Anthony Lister, “Power Tripping.”
For his new show “Power Tripping" opening tonight - June 26th, 2014 - at Jonathan LeVine Gallery in New York City, New York Anthony Lister has produced a body of paintings that, through rough strokes and bold colors, begin to resemble heroic beings.  Lister calls his style “Adventure Painting” which embraces mistakes and chance.  The method seems to be a successful one as the works are certainly an adventure for the eyes.  See more below:
Read More supersonicart:


Anthony Lister, “Power Tripping.”
For his new show “Power Tripping" opening tonight - June 26th, 2014 - at Jonathan LeVine Gallery in New York City, New York Anthony Lister has produced a body of paintings that, through rough strokes and bold colors, begin to resemble heroic beings.  Lister calls his style “Adventure Painting” which embraces mistakes and chance.  The method seems to be a successful one as the works are certainly an adventure for the eyes.  See more below:
Read More

supersonicart:

Anthony Lister, “Power Tripping.”

For his new show “Power Tripping" opening tonight - June 26th, 2014 - at Jonathan LeVine Gallery in New York City, New York Anthony Lister has produced a body of paintings that, through rough strokes and bold colors, begin to resemble heroic beings.  Lister calls his style “Adventure Painting” which embraces mistakes and chance.  The method seems to be a successful one as the works are certainly an adventure for the eyes.  See more below:

Read More